Shambhala Art 1 & 2

with Sensei, Alexandra Shenpen & Mindy Upton

February 1st—February 2nd

Date details +
    Price.:
  • $125 Full Price
  • $150 Sponsor
  • $108 BSC Member
  • $75 Subsidized
Room: Main Shrine Room

The purpose of dharma art is to try to overcome aggression. ~Chogyam Trungpa

In Shambhala Art, we learn mostly through experiential exercises that make us aware and help us explore and discover the creative process. Art has long been an expression of the very best society has to offer. Shambhala Art provides an opportunity for everyone to see their life as 'art in everyday life'. In many traditions, artists have trained not only in their discipline, but they also have trained their minds in awareness, confidence, and compassion. Shambhala Art allows us to experience the profound teachings on art developed by the great Tibetan meditation teacher, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche.

These teachings unlock a non-conceptual sense of expression that is available to all. Experiential exercises bring us a deeper understanding of ourselves as powerfully creative beings. Trungpa Rinpoche says of artists, "You could play a tremendous role in developing peace throughout the world." This workshop, the first of a five-part series, builds our capacity to do so. We'll focus on truly coming to our senses, both literally and figuratively. No prior art or meditation experience is necessary. 

Part 2: Seeing Things as They Are looks more closely at the process of perception and how our thinking influences our perceptions.  To express clearly we need to know the difference between our thoughts about something and the thing itself. The exercises in Part Two point us in the direction of non-conceptual knowing.

This two-day workshop will include meditation instruction, perception exercises, and discussion about the creative process that can be applicable to any art form and any level of experience in art or meditation.  Join us in exploring mindful sensory awareness and how it can enhance your creativity, meditation practice and daily life, whether you consider yourself an artist or not.